Old farming practices gave rise to atmospheric emission, study says
Image Source: UPI.com

In the recent study, it said that the ancient farming practices that are done by the farmers gave rise in the atmospheric emission of the heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide as well as methane. It is the rise that has continued till now and changed the climatic conditions of the Earth, as per the study.

These type of findings, which are led by the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown that the ancient farmers have cleared the land to plant the wheat as well as maize, potatoes, and even squash. The flooded fields have been used to grow rice as well as raised livestock, but it has altered the climate of the Earth.

Without any human influence, the start of the Industrial Revolution, as well as the planet, would be likely headed for another ice age, as said by researchers. According to Stephen Vavrus, who is the lead author said that if the practice is right during the early agriculture, then the climate would have much cooler now. He said that the ancient farming by farmers had produced the big amount of carbon dioxide as well as methane gas which have influenced the climate of the environment.

This study has been published in the Journal Scientific Reports. This is based on the sophisticated climate model that has been compared with the current geologic period which is known as Holocene that is about 800,000 years ago. These results show that the MIS19 which was already about 2.3 degree Fahrenheit cooler than the equivalent time in the Holocene, which is around 1850.

With the help of the climate reconstructions which is based on the ice core data, the model has shown about the MIS19 as well as Holocene which has begun with a similar carbon dioxide as well as methane concentrations. It has been observed that MIS19 has got an overall drop in both greenhouse gases as well as in Holocene reversed direction which is 5,000 years ago.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here